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UNO General Education Task Force

Approved Courses

Click on the blue links to view courses that have been approved for inclusion in the general education curriculum. Courses are being added frequently to this list.

Grade Requirements

Students must earn a grade of C- or better in all general education coursework.

Fundamental Academic Skills (15 hours)

English & Writing (9 hours)
9 hours to include English 1150 and 1160 [may test out of one or both] and one additional three-hour advanced writing course or equivalent writing intensive courses. Note: Advanced / intensive writing courses are determined by the academic program.

The work of the university is to construct and share knowledge. Because this work is done largely by means of the written word, it is important for students to gain control over written language. Proficiency in reading, research, and written expression is essential for professional success and effective citizenship. The foundational writing courses (Composition I and Composition II) provide instruction in general academic literacy while advanced writing and writing-intensive courses, preferably taken in the student's major, introduce research and language practices specific to the disciplines.

After completing Composition I, successful students shall be able to do the following:

• closely read, critically interpret, evaluate, and respond to other writers' texts;
• write papers with a clear thesis, logical structure, and cohesive, well-developed paragraphs;
• write papers with clear, varied, well-constructed sentences, with usage and mechanics conforming to standard edited English;
• demonstrate an understanding of writing as a complex, recursive process whereby ideas are explored, developed, and communicated to a particular audience for a particular purpose.

After completing Composition II, successful students shall be able to do the following:

• demonstrate further development of the writing skills learned in Composition I;
• locate and evaluate information in print and electronic sources and integrate the information into their own texts, citing the sources appropriately; • analyze arguments in other writers' texts;
• craft well-informed, carefully-reasoned arguments of their own, using the genre appropriate for the rhetorical context (e.g. position paper, proposal, evaluation).

After completing the advanced writing course or writing-intensive courses, students shall be able to do the following:

• demonstrate further development of the writing skills learned in foundational composition courses;
• engage in the major discipline's research practices, using the databases, bibliographies, and documentation conventions appropriate to the discipline;
• use the writing strategies and genres expected in the relevant academic and professional communities;
• demonstrate command of the major discipline's discourse practices, vocabulary, and style.

Approved Courses
ENGL 1150/54 - Composition I
ENGL 1160/64 - Composition II or ENGL 2160 - Honors Composition: Reasoning and Research
Advanced Writing: See your academic advisor for the Advanced Writing courses approved for your degree program.
Mathematics (3 hours)
Mathematics MATH 1310-Intermediate Algebra (3 hours)
Algebra is a foundational branch of mathematics that involves operations and relations, and which emphasizes the process of formulating, solving, interpreting, and applying equations of many different types to solve many different real-world problems, using systems of abstract symbols. It is a branch of mathematics with significant applications across a wide variety of disciplines.

Successful students shall be able to do the following:

• demonstrate competency in quantitative reasoning that applies algebra;
• demonstrate competency in symbolic reasoning in the solution to real-world problems;
• demonstrate competency in computational reasoning as it relates to the application of algebraic processes and concepts; and
• demonstrate an ability to solve real-world problems using quantitative, logical, or computational approaches that are typical of mathematical thinking.

Approved Courses
MATH 1310 - Intermediate Algebra (3 hours)*

*Students with an ACT MATH score of 23 or higher are considered to be proficient in MATH 1310. The Math Placement Exam or Compass Exam into MATH 1320 or high does NOT equal proficiency of MATH 1310.

Public Speaking (3 hours)
Public Speaking (3 hours)
The goal of the public speaking requirement is to help students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for effective oral communication in academic career or community life. Students must complete one of the following 3-credit hour courses – Speech 1110 or 2120.

Successful students shall be able to do the following:

• create and develop messages demonstrating effective audience analysis and adaptation;
• create and develop messages demonstrating effective information gathering, analysis, and evaluation;
• create and deliver messages demonstrating effective organizational development and use of supporting materials from credible sources; and
• present appropriate messages, including effective use of language, nonverbal delivery, and visual information/technology.

Approved Courses
SPCH 1110 - Public Speaking Fundamentals
SPCH 2120 - Argumentation and Debate

Distribution Requirements (26 hours)

NOTE: Courses which also meet Diversity requirements are indicated as follows: Diversity-US (D-US) Diversity-Global (D-G)

Humanities/Fine Arts (9 hours)
Humanities/Fine Arts (9 hours from at least two disciplines)
The humanities and fine arts seek to help students understand, analyze, and explore the human condition. Studying the humanities and fine arts thus contributes to personal growth and well-being as well as to living in and contributing to various communities. Students must complete 9 credit hours of course work representing at least two different disciplines in this category.

Successful students shall be able to do the following:

• demonstrate an understanding of the theories, methods, and concepts used to comprehend and respond to the human condition;
• recognize, articulate, and explore how various humanists/artists have responded to the human condition;
• comprehend and evaluate how humanistic/artistic expression contributes to individual and/or socio-cultural understanding, growth, and well-being, and
• Use relevant critical, analytic, creative, speculative and/or reflective methods

Approved Courses
ART 1010 - Art Appreciation (D-US)
ART 2040 - Cross-Cultural Survey of Art (D-G)
ART 2050 - Survey of Western Art History I
ART 2060 - Survey of Western Art History II
BLST 2100 - Black American Culture(D-US)
BLST 2260 - Black Short Story(Cross-listed with ENGL 2260) (D-US)
BLST 2730 - Religion and Theology in Afro-America
BRCT 1050 - Film History and Appreciation (Cross-listed with THEA 1050)
CIST 3110 - Information Technology Ethics
ENGL 1010 - Introduction to Genre Studies: Prose
ENGL 1020 - Introduction to Genre Studies: Poetry, Drama, and Film
ENGL 1200 - Autobiographical Reading and Writing (Cross-listed with HUMN 1200)
ENGL 2230 - Ethnic Literature (D-US)
ENGL 2250 - The Short Story
ENGL 2260 - Black Short Story (Cross-listed with BLST 2260) (D-US)
ENGL 2310 - Introduction to English Literature
ENGL 2320 - Introduction to English Literature
ENGL 2450 - American Literature
ENGL 2460 - American Literature
ENGL 2470 - Native American Literature (D-US)
ENGL 2490 - Latino/a Literature (D-US)
ENGL 2500 - Literature of Western Civilization: The Ancient World
ENGL 2510 - Literature of Western Civilization: Middles Ages to Enlightenment
ENGL 3130 - American Nonfiction
FREN 1110 - Elementary French (D-G)
GERM 1110 - Elementary German (D-G)
HIST 1000- World Civilizations I (D-G)
HIST 1010- World Civilizations II (D-G)
HIST 1110- American History to 1865
HIST 1120 - American History since 1865
HIST 2190 - Modern Middle East (Cross-listed with RELI 2190, SOC 2190) (D-G)
HORT 2000- Landscape & Environmental Appreciation
HUMN 1110 - Perspectives on US American Culture (3 hours)
HUMN 1200 - Autobiographical Reading and Writing (Cross-listed with ENGL 1200)
JAPN 1110 - Elementary Japanese (D-G)
LLS 1020 - Introduction to Chicano-Latino Studies: Humanities (D-US)
LLS 2800 - Special Topics in Latino/Latin American Studies(D-G)
MUS 1070 - Music of the People: Rock and Pop (D-US)
MUS 1080 - Music of the People: The World (D-G)
MUS 1090 - Music Appreciation
MUS 1100 - Survey of Jazz
MUS 2700 - University Chorus
MUS 2760 - University Concert Band
PHIL 1010 - Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1020 - Contemporary Moral Problems
PHIL 1210 - Critical Reasoning
PHIL 2030 - Introduction to Ethics
PSCI 2310 - Intro to Political Theory
RELI 1010 - Introduction to World Religions (D-G)
RELI 2190 - Modern Middle East (Cross-listed with HIST 2190, SOC 2190) (D-G)
RUSS 1110 - Elementary Russian (D-G)
SOC 2190 - Modern Middle East (Cross-listed with HIST 2190, RELI 2190) (D-G)
SPAN 1110 - Elementary Spanish (D-G)
THEA 1010 - Introduction to Theatre
THEA 1050 - Film History and Appreciation (Cross-listed with BRCT 1050)
THEA 1090 - Oral Interpretation of Literature
THEA 2310 - Acting I
THEA 4050 - Shakespeare on Film: The Art of Interpretation
WGST 2020 - Introduction to Women's Studies: The Humanities (D-US)
WRWS 1500- Introduction to Creative Writing
Social Sciences (9 hours)
Social Sciences (9 hours from at least two different disciplines)
Understanding the complex dynamics that make up the world, particularly the challenges, problems, and factors that lead to social stability and change is essential for contributing to and living in contemporary society.

Successful students shall be able to do the following:

• demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of interactions between human motivations, institutional forces, and/or social behavior;
• use critical thinking and reasoning skills to analyze theories, perspectives, and/or concepts relative to the discipline(s) studied.
• identify multiple methods and modes of inquiry and their appropriate application; and
• communicate ideas and explain concepts and analyses using the language of the discipline(s).

Approved Courses
ACCT 2000 - Accounting for Non-Business Majors
ANTH 1050 - Introduction to Anthropology
AVN 1000 - Introduction to Aviation and Aerospace
AVN 2510 - Diversity in Aviation (D-US)
BLST 1000 - Introduction to Black Studies (D-US)
BLST 1400 - Issues in Black Communities (D-US)
CRCJ 1010 - Survey of Criminal Justice
CIST 2100 - Organizations, Applications, and Technology
ECON 1200 - Introduction to the US Economy
ECON 2200 - Principles of Economics (Micro)
ECON 2220 - Principles of Economics (Macro)
EMGT 1000 - Introduction to Emergency Management
ENGL 2280 - Introduction to Language (D-US)
ENGL 3610 - Introduction to Linguistics (D-US)
GDRH 2110 - Core Topics in the Social Sciences: Life-Span Development
GDRH 2120 - Core Topics in the Social Sciences: Social Issues
GEOG 1000 - Fundamentals of World Regional Geography (D-G)
GEOG 1020 - Intro to Human Geography (D-G)
GERO 2000 - Introduction to Gerontology (D-US)
JOUR 1500 - Introduction to Mass Communication
LLS 1000 - Introduction to Latino/Latin American Studies (D-G)
LLS 1010 - Introduction to Chicano-Latino Studies: Social Sciences (D-US)
LLS 2900 - Special Topics in Latino/Latin American Studies: Social Sciences (D-G)
PSCI 1000 - Introduction to Political Science (D-G)
PSCI 1100 - Introduction to American National Government
PSCI 2120 - Civic Leadership
PSCI 2210 - International Relations (D-G)
PSCI 2500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (D-G)
PSCI 3140 - Latino/-a Politics (D-US)
PSYC 1010 - Introduction to Psychology I
SOC 1010 - Introductory Sociology
SOC 2100 - Social Problems
SOC 2150 - Marriage and the Family (D-US)
SOWK 1000 - Social Work and Social Welfare
SPCH 1310 - Perspectives in Communication Studies
SPCH 2010 - Interpersonal Communication
SPCH 2410 - Small Group Communication and Leadership
WGST 2010 - Introduction to Women's Studies: Social and Behavioral Science (D-US)
Natural & Physical Sciences (8 hours)
Natural and Physical Sciences (8 hours from at least two different disciplines)
Understanding the nature of scientific inquiry and the operation of the natural, physical, and technological world is essential for making personal and public policy decisions. Students must complete 8 credit hours of course work representing at least two different disciplines in this category with at least one laboratory course.

Successful students shall be able to do the following:

• demonstrate a broad understanding of the fundamental laws and principles of science and interrelationships among science and technology disciplines;
• demonstrate a broad understanding of various natural and/or physical phenomena that surround and influence our lives;
• describe how scientists approach and solve problems including an understanding of the basic components and limitations of the scientific method; and
• solve problems and draw conclusions based on scientific information and models, using critical thinking and qualitative and quantitative analysis of data and concepts in particular to distinguish reality from speculation.

Approved Courses
BIOI 1000 - Introduction to Bioinformatics
BIOL 1020 - Principles of Biology
BIOL 1330 - Environmental Biology
BIOL 1450 - Biology I
CHEM 1010 - Chemistry in the Environment and Society (*prerequisite required)
CHEM 1014 - Chemistry in the Environment and Society Laboratory (*prerequisite required)
CHEM 1140 - Fundamentals of College Chemistry (*prerequisite required)
CHEM 1144 - Fundamentals of College Chemistry Laboratory (*prerequisite required)
CHEM 1180 - General Chemistry I
CHEM 1184 - General Chemistry I Laboratory
CSCI 1200 - Computer Science Principles
FSCI 1310 - Science of Food
FSMT 1600 - Fire Chemistry
GEOG 1030 - Introduction to Earth and Environmental Science
GEOG 1060 - Physical Geography: Climate and Waters
GEOG 1070 - Physical Geography: Soils and Landforms
GEOG 1090 - Introduction to Geospatial Sciences
GEOL 1010 - Environmental Geology
GEOL 1100 - Earth System Science
GEOL 1104 - Earth System Science Laboratory
GEOL 1170 - Physical Geology
GEOL 2100 - Geology of Nebraska
GEOL 2500 - Special Topics in Geography-Geology
HORT 1300 - Introduction to Horticultural Science
HORT 1310 - Introduction to Horticultural Science/Lab
HORT 2120 - Landscape Plants I
PE 2400 - Human Physiology and Anatomy I
PHYS 1030 - Physics of Life
PHYS 1034 - Physics of Life Laboratory
PHYS 1050 - Introduction to Physics
PHYS 1054 - Introduction to Physics Laboratory
PHYS 1110 - General Physics
PHYS 1154 - General Physics Laboratory
PHYS 1350 - Principles of Astronomy
PHYS 1354 - Introductory Astronomy Lab

Diversity (6 hours)

A general education requires exposure to cultures and institutions around the world, as well as within one’s own society, in order to promote intellectual flexibility, cultural understanding and informed citizenship. The university seeks to foster cultural understanding to assist its students to become responsible citizens in a diverse world. Students must complete 6 credit hours of coursework with 3 credit hours in each of the following areas.

NOTE; Courses which also meet Distribution requirements are indicated as follows: Humanities/Fine Arts (HFA); Social Sciences (SS); Natural/Physical Sciences (NPS)

Diversity - Global (3 hours)
Global Diversity
Courses in this category focus on significant cultural, economic, geographical, historical, political, and/or sociological aspects of one or more countries or nations (including indigenous nations) other than or in comparison to the United States. Students must complete 3 credit hours of coursework.

Successful students shall be able to do the following:

• recognize the cultural, historical, social, economic, and/or political circumstances that produce different social and cultural systems;
• demonstrate specific knowledge of the cultural, historical, social, economic, and/or political aspects of one or more countries or nations other than the United States;
• explain the interrelations among global economic, political, environmental and/or social systems; and
• explain ways in which identity is developed and how it is transmitted within and by members of the group or groups.

Approved Courses
ART 2040 - Cross-Cultural Survey of Art (HFA)
CRCJ 4750 - International Criminology and Criminal Justice
CRCJ 4760 - Terrorism
ENGL 3290 - Irish Literature II
FREN 1110 - Elementary French (HFA)
GEOG 1000 - Fundamentals of World Regional Geography (SS)
GEOG 1020 - Intro to Human Geography (SS)
GERM 1110 - Elementary German (HFA)
HED 4650- Global Health
HIST 1000- World Civilizations I (HFA)
HIST 1010- World Civilizations II (HFA)
HIST 2190 - Modern Middle East (Cross-listed with RELI 2190, SOC 2190) (HFA)
IASC 1100 - Introduction to Information Security
INST 2130 - International Studies
ISQA 3420 - Managing in a Digital World
JAPN 1110 - Elementary Japanese (HFA)
LLS 1000 - Introduction to Latino/Latin American Studies (SS)
LLS 2800 - Special Topics in Latino/Latin American Studies (HFA)
LLS 2900 - Special Topics in Latino/Latin American Studies: Social Sciences (SS)
LLS 3680 - Latin American Politics (Cross-listed with PSCI 3680)
MUS 1080 - Music of the People: The World (HFA)
PHIL 2040 - Introduction to East Asian Philosophy
PSCI 1000 - Introduction to Political Science (SS)
PSCI 2210 - International Relations (SS)
PSCI 2500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (SS)
PSCI 3500 - Politics of Western Europe
PSCI 3640 - Government and Politics in China and East Asia
PSCI 3660 - Government and Politics in Japan and East Asia
PSCI 3680 - Latin American Politics(Cross-listed with LLS 3680)
PSCI 3700 - Middle East Politics
PSCI 4200 - International Relations of East Asia
PSCI 4210 - International Relations of the Middle East
PSCI 4520 - Politics of France
PSCI 4620 - Islam and Politics
RELI 1010 - Introduction to World Religions (HFA)
RELI 2190 - Modern Middle East (Cross-listed with HIST 2190, SOC 2190) (HFA)
RUSS 1110 - Elementary Russian (HFA)
SOC 2190 - Modern Middle East (Cross-listed with HIST 2190, RELI 2190) (HFA)
SOC 3950 - Sociology of Latin America
SOC 4250 - Latino/a Migration in the World Economy
SPAN 1110 - Elementary Spanish (HFA)
SPCH 4570 - Intercultural Communication - Global
Diversity - US (3 hours)
Diversity in the US
Courses in this category focus on significant cultural, economic, historical, political, and/or sociological aspects of one or more underrepresented groups in the United States. Students must complete 3 credit hours of coursework.

Successful students shall be able to do the following:

• demonstrate knowledge of the role and contributions of one or more underrepresented groups in the development of the United States;
• demonstrate specific knowledge of cultural, historical, social, economic, and/or political factors that shape aspects of one or more diverse groups;
• recognize and articulate differences, expectations, and/or challenges experienced by one or more underrepresented groups;
• Explain ways in which identity is developed and how it is transmitted within and by members of the group or groups.

Approved Courses
ART 1010 - Art Appreciation (HFA)
AVN 2510 - Diversity in Aviation (SS)
BLST 1000 - Introduction to Black Studies (SS)
BLST 1400 - Issues in Black Communities (SS)
BLST 2100 - Black American Culture (HFA)
BLST 2260 - Black Short Story (Cross-listed with ENGL 2260) (HFA)
CRCJ 3380 - Minorities and Criminal Justice
CRCJ 3390 - Women, Crime, and Justice
EDUC 2030 - Human Relations for Bias-Free Classrooms
ENGL 2230 - Ethnic Literature (HFA)
ENGL 2260 - Black Short Story (Cross-listed with BLST 2260) (HFA)
ENGL 2280 - Introduction to Language (SS)
ENGL 2470 - Native American Literature (HFA)
ENGL 2490 - Latino/a Literature (HFA)
ENGL 3610 - Introduction to Linguistics (SS)
GERO 2000 - Introduction to Gerontology (SS)
HED 4700 Women’s Health and Issues of Diversity (Cross-listed with SOC 4700)
HUMN 1110 - Perspectives on US American Culture (3 hours)
LLS 1010 - Introduction to Chicano-Latino Studies: Social Sciences (SS)
LLS 1020 - Introduction to Chicano-Latino Studies: Humanities (HFA)
MUS 1070 - Music of the People: Rock and Pop (HFA)
NAMS 1100 - Introduction to Native American Studies
PSCI 3130 - Women and Politics
PSCI 3140 - Latino/-a Politics (SS)
SOC 2150 - Marriage and the Family (SS)
SOC 3820 - Medical Sociology
SOC 3900 - Race and Ethnic Relations in the U.S.
SOC 4150 - American Family problems
SOC 4300 - Sociology of Gender
SOC 4700 Women’s Health and Issues of Diversity (Cross-listed with HED 4700)
SOWK 2120 - Race, Class, and Gender in the United States
SPCH 3750 - Gender and Communication
SPCH 4530 - Intercultural Communication - US
SPED 2220 - The History, Psychology and Sociology of Deafness
WGST 2010 - Introduction to Women's Studies: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
WGST 2020 - Introduction to Women's Studies: The Humanities (HFA)
WGST 3750 - Gender and Communication